Current Position£ºHome >> Media
Environmental Hero: Xu Kezhu
author£º Center for Legal Assistance to Pollution Victims    Published£º2008-7-21    Hits£º3668´Î

Today¡¯s Shanghai Daily (SD) reports that a ¡°garlic extract factory¡± in Hunan Province has been accused of polluting the Xiangjiang for more than seven years.  I knew garlic could do a number on vampires, but one of the ingredients of the extract ¡°chloropropylene,¡± can also ¡°be harmful to human[s] and may cause environmental pollution.¡± In fact 



Villagers living near Jingtian Technical Co Ltd in Wangcheng County have died of cancer, liver failure or stomach bleeding after the company began making garlic extract in 2001.


Here is the rest of the sad story




Fish farmer Chen Lifang, whose home was 3 meters from the plant, moved house after the fish in the river all died. Fang Wenkai, from neighboring Shutangshan Village, said that one rainy night the factory poured waste out of a window, killing all the plants nearby. Fang¡¯s two cows died after eating grass near the factory, but the company denied responsibility.


After complaints from villagers, Wangcheng¡¯s environmental protection bureau fined Jingtian several times and ordered it to suspend production.


The company spent 3 million yuan (US$440,000) to renovate its workshop and build a waste-water drainage system in 2004. Its General Manager Zhou Jiancheng said waste-water drainage was zero after the refurbishment.


Things would seem to have been solved, but




a water sample test on May 22 last year showed water from the plant was polluting Xiangjiang River, said Xu Kezhu, vice director of the non-profit Center for Legal Assistance to Pollution Victims at China¡¯s University of Political Science and Law. Xu and his colleagues found many problems with Jingtian¡¯s environmental impact assessment after villagers asked the center for assistance.


The same case is featured in a recent Christian Science Monitor article on Xu Kezhu (a she, not a he as reported by the SD), but with more colorful details (plus a picture of some of the villagers). More details can also be found in this Washington Monthly article.


The local regulators have not been particularly helpful in the latest round of troubles with the factory. As the CSM notes the ¡°villagers¡¯ many appeals to local authorities have not yielded substantial results.¡±  The SD notes that ¡°Changsha¡¯s environment watchdog issued a statement last Thursday saying the factory had met environment protection standards and there was no evidence of pollution.¡±  The factory owner admits some pollution problems, but according to the CSM, claims that ¡°evidence has not been gathered to link villagers¡¯ ills to the factory.¡±  According to the law, the burden is not on the villagers to prove the link, the factory owner is required to prove that there is no link.


The CSM reports that Xu is ¡°working with an environmental lawyer in nearby Changsha City to document the pollution. Their aim is to prepare a lawsuit to force the factory to shut down or upgrade.¡±


Thanks, to the work of Xu Kezhu and her colleagues at the Center for Legal Assistance to Pollution Victims, for working to make China¡¯s legal system fulfill its promise of providing redress to those injured by environmental pollutants!  Xu is an environmental law professor and is married to a Chinese diplomat, so she certainly had other less taxing career options.  She decided to dedicate herself to helping those who have hitherto been powerless to help themselves; we should all be grateful she chose this path.




¡°I want them to make the law work,¡± says Shutangshan resident Chen Li Fang [to the CSM], who has seen her orange trees shrivel and their fruit grow bitter [note: Chen Lifang was identified as a devastated fish farmer in the SD article, hmm?].


It appears the law may have worked.  The last sentence of the SD piece reports that the ¡°company has now been ordered to move its factory from the village.¡±

Copyright: Center for Legal Assistance to Pollution Victims